OUR TECHNICIANS

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DIANA M. DAVIES
Senior Marine Chemist

E: diana.davies@csiro.au

Social Links

Current AAPP Activities:

Whole water sample collection for nutrients and phytoplankton community composition from moorings in the Southern Ocean over a 12month period, and the associated problems of preservation, corrosion and biofouling continue to present challenges for the IMOS program.  With the decommissioning of the successful Pulse mooring, the McLane Remote Access Sampler (500mL) has been relocated from a cage at 30m to the hull of the SOTS mooring. This has added engineering problems including mooring failure to the list of challenges. Although the transition has not been smooth, samples have been returned successfully, the RAS operation is simpler, novel solutions have been found and plenty more are needed. SOTS voyage participation and provision of methods and equipment to ground truth sensor data remains part of the activity with plenty of scope remaining for creative variations.

Current AAPP Activities:

Whole water sample collection for nutrients and phytoplankton community composition from moorings in the Southern Ocean over a 12month period, and the associated problems of preservation, corrosion and biofouling continue to present challenges for the IMOS program.  With the decommissioning of the successful Pulse mooring, the McLane Remote Access Sampler (500mL) has been relocated from a cage at 30m to the hull of the SOTS mooring. This has added engineering problems including mooring failure to the list of challenges. Although the transition has not been smooth, samples have been returned successfully, the RAS operation is simpler, novel solutions have been found and plenty more are needed. SOTS voyage participation and provision of methods and equipment to ground truth sensor data remains part of the activity with plenty of scope remaining for creative variations.

More about Diana

Biography

An abiding interest in spectroscopy, chromatography and laboratory automation and a love of the marine environment combined with limited opportunities locally leads to a varied work history. I have been privileged to work with the late Prof Eric Holdsworth and John Jordan (UTAS) in the field of marine photosystem pigments leading to the separation of pigments by HPLC, one of the earliest publications in this area. During a contract with CSIRO Atmospheric Research, precipitation chemistry with Dr Greg Ayers and Dr John Ivey, it became clear that what had been identified as fluoride ions by ion chromatography, was actually methane sulphonate, an atmospheric oxidation product of dimethyl sulphide and a source of marine aerosols.  The next step was to look for it in other environmental samples i.e. high volume atmospheric samples from Cape Grim and Antarctic ice cores from Law Dome, laying the foundations for ongoing future programs.

There is a lot of water in between, including some time the HEC Civil Engineering corrosion and materials laboratory, Australian Government Analytical Labs., Cawthron Institute (NZ) and a lot of time at sea. More recently, as an ACE CRC employee based at CSIRO Marine with Dr Tom Trull, light natural abundance isotope mass spectroscopy of size fractionated marine particles collected on various voyages (in cold water and including a ship wreck) and a project with deep sea corals has been a joy.  In the current AAPP and IMOS programs I have happily handed over sediment traps, established as a long running time series in the Southern Ocean by Dr Tom Trull and Stephen Bray, and continue to develop the remote water sampler at the Southern Ocean Time Series site as my hours reduce on my way to retirement.

 

Awards / Grants

ARGC grant, PS2 pigments
Australian Brewers Association Grant: Cr insulin cofactor from Brewers yeast
RACI Prize for Chemistry, Tasmanian Branch
ACE CRC CEO’s award for excellence

Selected Publications

Eriksen, R., Trull, T.W., Davies, D., Jansen, P., Davidson, A.T., Westwood, K., van den Enden, R. (2018) “Seasonal succession of phytoplankton community structure from autonomous sampling at the Australian Southern Ocean Time Series (SOTS).” Marine Ecology Progress Series 589, 13-31 DOI: 10.3354/meps12420
Trull, Tom; Passmore, Abe; Davies, Di; Smit, Tim; Berry, Kate; Tilbrook, Bronte (2017) “Distribution of planktonic biogenic carbonate organisms in the Southern Ocean south of Australia: a baseline for ocean acidification impact assessment.” Biogeosciences, vol. 14, 1-19.
T. W. Trull, P. Jansen, E. Schulz, B. Weeding, D.M. Davies and S.G. Bray 2019. “Autonomous multi-trophic observations of productivity and export at the Australian Southern Ocean Time Series (SOTS) reveal sequential mechanisms of physical-biological coupling”. Frontiers in Marine Science. 6:525
A.S. Rigual Hernandes et al, (2020) “Coccolithophore biodiversity controls carbonate export in the Southern Ocean. Biogeoscienes, vol 17, 245-263
Schallenberg C., et al, (2018) “Sustained upwelling of subsurface iron supplies seasonally persistent phytoplankton blooms around the southern Kerguelen plateau, Southern Ocean”, J. Geophysical Research: Oceans vol 123, 5986-6003

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CHELSEA LONG
Ice Core Technician

E: chelsea.long@utas.edu.au

Current AAPP Activities:

Assisting in the routine preparation and processing of ice core samples, as well as undertaking glaciochemical trace analyses, contributing to the development of 2,000-year East Antarctic ice core records, and the EASI Antarctic project.

Current AAPP Activities:

Assisting in the routine preparation and processing of ice core samples, as well as undertaking glaciochemical trace analyses, contributing to the development of 2,000-year East Antarctic ice core records, and the EASI Antarctic project.

More about Chelsea

Biography

I am interested in ice core research because it provides physical links to the Earth’s past climate. This is extremely important for understanding the variability in our past, present and future climates. It has always been my ambition to work with ice cores, and in 2017 I completed my honours in Antarctic ice core sciences. My project was “Investigating the potential for volcanic sulphate aerosols to increase the flux of the cosmogenic radionuclide Beryllium-10 at Law Dome, East Antarctica”. This project involved glaciochemical trace analyses and accelerator mass spectrometry.  I also volunteer for the Young Tassie Scientist program during National Science Week bringing ice core science into Tasmanian classrooms and to the general public.  

Awards / Grants

2017 AMOS – Tasmanian Regional Award for Honours Research Thesis.

Associated links

http://youngtassiescientists.com/?scientists=chelsea-long

Meyerink

SCOTT MEYERINK
Sea-going Trace Element Chemist

E:  scott.meyerink@utas.edu.au

Current AAPP Activities:

My responsibilities include the preparation of equipment for aerosol and marine based sampling and the day to day support of AAPP and ARC supported trace element groups. I am actively involved in the discovery project ‘Dust to the Southern Ocean: Does it really increase productivity?’ where I work with the primary investigators to support all laboratory and field tasks.

Current AAPP Activities:

My responsibilities include the preparation of equipment for aerosol and marine based sampling and the day to day support of AAPP and ARC supported trace element groups. I am actively involved in the discovery project ‘Dust to the Southern Ocean: Does it really increase productivity?’ where I work with the primary investigators to support all laboratory and field tasks.

More about Scott

Biography

I obtained my Masters degree in Oceanography at the University of Southampton (UK) in September 2010, and completed a PhD in Marine Biogeochemistry at the Australian National University (Australia), where I investigated the effects of iron availability on nutrient uptake in marine diatoms. This work was undertaken as part of a larger project investigating the role the Southern Ocean plays in regulating global climate.

My professional experience includes a supervisory role at an environmental laboratory in Berrimah, Darwin, where I was responsible for the routine analysis of environmental (water) and geological samples for a wide range of clients.

My research interests include the cycling of trace elements in natural waters and their interactions with phytoplankton and analytical techniques related to detection of trace elements and their isotopes. I also have an active interest in water quality principals and EPA legislation.

 

Scientific Committee Memberships

RACI Member since 2013

Selected Publications

Meyerink, S.W., Ellwood, M.J., Maher, W.A., Price, G.D. and Strzepek, R (2017). Effects of iron
limitation on silicon uptake kinetics and elemental stoichiometry in two Southern Ocean diatoms,
Eucampia antarctica and Probocia inermis, and the temperate diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.
Journal of Limnology and Oceanography, doi: 10.1002/lno.10578.
Meyerink, S.W., Ellwood, M.J., Maher, W.A., Strzepek, R (2017). Iron Availability Influences
Silicon Isotope Fractionation in Two Southern Ocean Diatoms (Proboscia inermis and Eucampia
antarctica) and a Coastal Diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana). Frontiers in Marine Science, doi:
10.3389/fmars.2017.00217.
Meyerink, S.W., Boyd, P.W. Maher, W.A., Milne, A., Strzepek, R., Ellwood, M.J. (2018) Putting
the silicon cycle in a bag: Field observations of silicon isotope fractionation in subtropical waters
east of New Zealand. Marine Chemistry, 213, 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marchem.2019.04.008.

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CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
Research Technician – Ice Cores

E:  christopher.plummer@utas.edu.au

Social Links

Current AAPP Activities:

Chris Plummer focuses on developing techniques for continuous flow analysis of ice cores in support of Australia’s efforts to retrieve the oldest Antarctic ice. Chris also continuous to develop ice core timescales for existing ice core datasets through layer counting and modelling.

Current AAPP Activities:

My current work focuses on developing techniques for continuous flow analysis of ice cores in support of Australia’s efforts to retrieve the oldest Antarctic ice and other ice core research, with particular interest in major trace ion species, water isotopes, gases through a variety of techniques. I also continue development of ice core timescales for existing ice core datasets through layer counting and modelling, and research into volcanic eruptions in ice cores.

More about Christopher

Biography

I studied geology at UTAS before completing my Honours in the ice core field. Following this I completed my PhD on the major trace ion chemistry of Law Dome ice cores through the Holocene in 2018. I am interested in the chemical composition of ice cores, and using this as proxies for various climate processes to help develop palaeoclimate records. I am also interested in techniques for measuring various ice core chemical properties, and using this information to develop well resolved timescales for ice cores. Additionally I am interesting in investigating volcanic episodes recorded in ice cores and their historical impacts on climate and people.

 

Selected Publications

An independently dated 2000-yr volcanic record from Law Dome, East Antarctica, including a new perspective on the dating of the 1450s CE eruption of Kuwae, Vanuatu; Plummer, CT, Curran, MAJ, van Ommen, TD, Rasmussen, SO, Moy, AD, Vance, TR, Clausen, HB, Vinther, BM, Mayewski, PA, Climate of the Past, doi:10.5194/cp-8-1929-2012
Sub-1 mL sample requirement for simultaneous determination of 17 organic and inorganic anions and cations in Antarctic ice core samples by dual capillary ion chromatography, Estrella Sanz Rodriguez, Christopher Plummer, Meredith Nation, Andrew Moy, Mark Curran, Paul R. Haddad Brett Paull, Analytica Chimica Acta, doi.org/10.1016/j.aca.2019.02.014
A 2000-year annual record of snow accumulation rates for Law Dome, East Antarctica; Roberts, J, Plummer, C, Vance, T, van Ommen, T, Moy, A, Poynter, S, Treverrow, A, Curran, M, George, S, Climate of the Past, doi:10.5194/cp-11-697-2015
A Millennial Proxy Record of ENSO and Eastern Australian Rainfall from the Law Dome Ice Core, East Antarctica; Vance, TR, van Ommen, TD, Curran, MAJ, Plummer, CT, Moy, AD, Journal of Climate, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00003.1

Associated links

https://rmdb.research.utas.edu.au/public/rmdb/q/indiv_detail_warp_trans/36370

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PAM QUAYLE
Laboratory Manager

E: pam.quayle@utas.edu.au

Current AAPP Activities:

From trace chemical labs to ice core research, and from WHS to biosecurity – Pam Quayle is responsible for the overall management and operation of the research laboratories used by AAPP staff located at IMAS.

Current AAPP Activities:

Laboratory manager, Biosecurity manager

More about Pam

Biography

  • TBC

Cathryn W-Edwards

CATHRYN
WYNN-EDWARDS
Carbon Marine Analytical Chemist

E: cathryn.wynnedwards@utas.edu.au

Social Links

Current AAPP Activities:

As Carbon Marine Analytical Chemist my responsibilities lie in the preparation of the sediment traps, support during deployment and recovery voyages and post-recovery sample analysis. Together with my co-authors I write annual reports on the deployment and recovery of the SOTS moorings, including sensor information and voyage-related data. Analysing the particle flux time series for scientific publication is one aspect I particularly enjoy.

Current AAPP Activities:

As Carbon Marine Analytical Chemist my responsibilities lie in the preparation of the sediment traps, support during deployment and recovery voyages and post-recovery sample analysis. Together with my co-authors I write annual reports on the deployment and recovery of the SOTS moorings, including sensor information and voyage-related data. Analysing the particle flux time series for scientific publication is one aspect I particularly enjoy.

More about Cathryn

Biography

Originally from Europe, I came to Tasmania in 2008 to do my Honours and then PhD in Quantitative Marine Science. I have a keen interest in how human activities impact on the natural world. My Honours and PhD projects therefore focused on the impacts of ocean acidification on the basis of the Antarctic food web. After my PhD I worked on projects around human impacts and remediation in Antarctica as well as the antFOCE project out of Casey station. Since 2017 I have joined the Southern Ocean Time Series as Carbon Marine Analytical Chemist, more specifically the sediment trap based particle flux time series in the subantarctic Zone southwest off Tasmania.

 

Awards / Grants

Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology Honours Scholarship,
University of Tasmania - 2008
Endeavour International Postgraduate Research Scholarship 2009 - 2013
Quantitative Marine Science Scholarship top-up scholarship 2009
CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship top – up Scholarship 2009 - 2013
ANZ Trustees Foundation – Holsworth Wildlilfe Research Endowment 2009 - 2013

Selected Publications

Southern Ocean Time Series (SOTS) Quality Assessment and Control Report - Sediment Trap Particle Fluxes Version 1.0 (DOI: 10.26198/5dfad21358a8d)
IMOS - ABOS SOUTHERN OCEAN TIME SERIES (SOTS) - ANNUAL REPORTS
Wynn-Edwards C, King R, Kawaguchi S, Davidson A, Wright S, Nichols DP, Virtue P (2014) Development
of a continuous phytoplankton culture system for ocean acidification experiments. Water, 6 (6)1860-
1872
Wynn-Edwards C, King R, Davidson A, Wright S, Nichols DP, Wotherspoon S, Kawaguchi S, Virtue P
(2014) Species-specific variations in the nutritional quality of Southern Ocean phytoplankton in
response to elevated pCO2. Water, 6 (6)1840-1859