PHD PROJECTS

The impact of Antarctic sea ice on simulated Southern Ocean watermasses

Abstract

Do you know how important Antarctic sea ice is for the global climate?

Neither do we (nor anyone else for that matter). But we do know that sea ice plays a key role in the global ocean's uptake of 90% of the heat trapped on the planet by anthropogenic emissions, so this is an important question. We are looking for a motivated, creative individual with strong quantitative skills to tackle that question, as part of a world-class team oceanographers and sea ice experts.
The successful applicant will use data from the state-of-science climate models that are used to inform IPCC reports, to investigate how Antarctic sea ice affects the circulation of the Southern Ocean, how well those processes are represented in the models, and the global implications of those processes in a warming climate.

Over the course of the project, the student will communicate their research in top tier scientific journals, and at domestic and international conferences.

Supervisory Team

Will Hobbs
Jan Zika
Zanna Chase

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

For information on eligibility and the application process please click below

Frontal variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

Abstract

This project will improve the characterization of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current fronts variability and change. The analysis is circumpolar with the observational and reanalysis datasets.

Supervisory Team

Max Nikurashin
Benoit Legresy
Steve Rintoul
Annie Foppert

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

For information on eligibility and the application process please click below

Response of the Larsen C Ice Shelf system to changes in grounding line forcing from numerical modelling

Abstract

The speed of Antarctic glaciers can vary substantially on tidal time scales. Using a combination of GPS observations and numerical modelling, this project will use glacier velocities to draw conclusions around ice shelf dynamics, the interaction of ice and its bed and the sensitivity of glaciers to changes in forcing.

Supervisory Team

Sue Cook
Matt King
Chen Zhao

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

For information on eligibility and the application process please click below

Understanding the ice-ocean interaction in Wilkes Land, Antarctica

Abstract

In the past decade, the main mass loss in the East Antarctica was dominated by the Wilkes Land, which was attributable to the increases in ocean-induced basal melt. Using a coupled ice sheet ocean model, this project will explore the ice ocean interaction to better understand the significant role of warm water intrusion on the ice sheet instability in Wilkes Land and inform future field campaigns in this region.

Supervisory Team

Chen Zhao
Ben Galton-Fenzi
Terence O'Kane

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

For information on eligibility and the application process please click below

Volcanic fertilisation of the Kerguelen Plateau region

Abstract

Volcanism can supply a substantial amount of essential nutrient iron to the ocean surface via ash, pumice or hydrothermal vents – the so-called “hot iron”. Whilst they do occur in the Southern Ocean, eruptions from the Heard and MacDonald Islands region are so poorly observed it is difficult to characterize the extent of volcanic contribution to the marine productivity in the region.

This project will evaluate the role of recent (satellite era) eruptions from Heard and MacDonald Islands to ocean fertilization, using a unique approach of estimating transport of “hot” iron to East Antarctic ice cores, and then measuring volcanic particles and iron in available ice core material. It will also evaluate any confounding signal from regional volcanism to globally significant volcanic signals in East Antarctic ice cores.

Supervisory Team

Tessa Vance

Closing Date

1st October 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

For information on eligibility and the application process please click below