OUR CONTRIBUTED STAFF

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SIMON ALEXANDER
Co-Project Leader (Project 1)

E: simon.alexander@aad.gov.au

Social Links

Current AAPP Activities:

Dr Alexander is a co-project leader of Project 1 (Atmosphere).  He is working closely with other members of Project 1 to analyse the recent Southern Ocean field campaign datasets of clouds, aerosols, precipitation and radiation. These results will inform future model simulations with the goal of reducing the surface radiation bias presently found in many climate models. His focus is on quantifying occurrence of super-cooled liquid water clouds and precipitation phase within high-latitude cyclone systems; and is currently constructing a seasonal climatology of clouds from Macquarie Island.

Current AAPP Activities:

Dr Alexander is a co-project leader of Project 1 (Atmosphere).  He is working closely with other members of Project 1 to analyse the recent Southern Ocean field campaign datasets of clouds, aerosols, precipitation and radiation. These results will inform future model simulations with the goal of reducing the surface radiation bias presently found in many climate models. His focus is on quantifying occurrence of super-cooled liquid water clouds and precipitation phase within high-latitude cyclone systems; and is currently constructing a seasonal climatology of clouds from Macquarie Island.

More about Simon

Biography

Dr Simon Alexander is a Senior Research Scientist at the Australian Antarctic Division. His research interests have previously included diverse topics including equatorial convection, equatorial stratospheric dynamics, and GPS radio occultation temperature profiling. He has worked on quantifying the small-scale atmospheric processes which form polar stratospheric clouds (which are a key component in the annual Antarctic ozone destruction cycle), and on understanding temperature fluctuations and polar mesospheric clouds above Davis, Antarctica. Dr Alexander spent one winter at Davis in order to operate the polarisation lidar, which observed clouds and temperatures throughout the atmospheric column. He also has research interests in polar ozone and has contributed to the quadrennial WMO ozone assessment reports. 

Over the last five or so years, Dr Alexander has again shifted research focus to investigate Southern Ocean clouds, precipitation and aerosols. Clouds are still the source of some of the largest uncertainties when estimate the global climate sensitivity. In particular, many climate models have a large surface radiative bias over the Southern Ocean, which is traced back to uncertainties in our understanding of clouds. The clouds and aerosols present over the Southern Ocean are different from those in other regions of the world, due to the pristine nature of the air and minimal anthropogenic aerosol influences.

Dr Alexander was a leading investigator on recent major international Southern Ocean field campaigns designed to measure microphysical properties of clouds and aerosols from air, sea and land. He is currently working with collaborators to analyses these data and use them to improve atmospheric model simulations.

Scientific Committee Memberships

SCAR Aerosols and Climate Action Group
International Committee on Polar Meteorology (ICPM)
Australian Ozone Science Group

Selected Publications

Kuma, P., McDonald, A. J., Morgenstern, O., Alexander, S. P., Cassano, J. J., Garrett, S., Halla, J., Hartery, S., Harvey, M. J., Parsons, S., Plank, G., Varma, V. and Williams, J. (2020), ‘Evaluation of Southern Ocean cloud in the HadGEM3 general circulation model and MERRA-2 reanalysis using ship-based observations’, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 20, 6607-6630, doi:10.5194/acp-20-6607-2020
Vignon, É., Picard, G., Duràn-Alarcòn, C., Alexander, S. P., Gallée, H., Berne, A. (2020), ‘Gravity wave excitation during the coastal transition of an extreme katabatic flow in Antarctica’, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 77, 1295 – 1312, doi:10.1175/JAS-D-19-0264
Alexander, S. P. and Protat, A. (2019), ‘Vertical profiling of aerosols with a combined Raman-elastic backscatter lidar in the remote Southern Ocean marine boundary layer (43 – 66°S, 132 – 150°E)’, Journal of Geophysical Research, 124, 12,307 – 12,125, doi:10.1029/2019JD030628
Protat, A., Klepp, C., Louf, V., Petersen, W. A., Alexander, S. P., Barros, A., Leinonen, J. and Mace, G. G., (2019), ‘The latitudinal variability of oceanic rainfall properties and its implication for satellite retrievals. Part 1: Drop Size Distribution Properties’, Journal of Geophysical Research, 124, 13,291 – 13,311, doi:10.1029/2019JD031010
Sato, K., Inoue, J., Alexander, S. P., McFarquhar, G., Yamazaki, Y. (2018), ‘Improved reanalysis and prediction of atmospheric fields over the Southern Ocean using campaign-based radiosonde observations’, Geophysical Research Letters, 45, 11406 – 11413, doi:10.1029/2018GL079037

Associated links

https://www.antarctica.gov.au/science/meet-our-scientists/dr-simon-alexander-atmospheric-scientist/

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KATE BERRY
Senior Experimental Scientist

E:  kate.berry@csiro.au

  CSIRO Profile

About Kate & AAPP Involvement:

Kate organises the collection of seawater samples on Antarctic voyages to track ocean carbon dioxide levels. She analyses the samples for alkalinity and total CO2 either on the ship or in the CSIRO ocean carbon laboratory in Hobart, using instrumentation and certified reference materials to ensure high precision analytical results.

About Kate & AAPP Involvement:

Kate organises the collection of seawater samples on Antarctic voyages to track ocean carbon dioxide levels. She analyses the samples for alkalinity and total CO2 either on the ship or in the CSIRO ocean carbon laboratory in Hobart, using instrumentation and certified reference materials to ensure high precision analytical results.

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PETRA HEIL
Co-Theme Leader (Theme 3)

E: petra.heil@utas.edu.au

  AAD Profile

About Petra & AAPP Involvement:

Petra is a sea-ice physicist working across observations (in situ, autonomous, aerial, satellite-borne) to numerical modelling of the ocean-ice-atmosphere system. Her scientific interest is to understand how short-term processes (incl synoptic-scale systems, tides) affect the sea-ice characteristics, and how the sea ice responds to these stressors. Together with her national and overseas colleagues she is working on various aspects to derive increased knowledge of the ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions with view to better understand the Earth system and to contribute to numerical modelling efforts (incl data assimilation). 

Petra engages with researchers and operationally-focussed colleagues on a range of issues, including the COSIMA model analyses; instrument development and deployment (incl. With ANU [Au]; UAdelaide [Au]; UMelbourne [Au]; Polar Research Institute of China [China]; Masdar Institute [UAE]), field projects (incl. AWI [Germany]; Univ Capetown [Sth Africa], Otago University [NZ]; NASA [USA]), Best Practices in data acquisition and analyses (incl. SCAR/ASPeCt; SCAR/AFIN; IPAB; WMO’s Global Cryosphere Watch; WCRP WDAC; ESA; International Ice Charting Working Group). 

Current AAPP Activities:

Petra is a sea-ice physicist working across observations (in situ, autonomous, aerial, satellite-borne) to numerical modelling of the ocean-ice-atmosphere system. Her scientific interest is to understand how short-term processes (incl synoptic-scale systems, tides) affect the sea-ice characteristics, and how the sea ice responds to these stressors. Together with her national and overseas colleagues she is working on various aspects to derive increased knowledge of the ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions with view to better understand the Earth system and to contribute to numerical modelling efforts (incl data assimilation). 

Petra engages with researchers and operationally-focussed colleagues on a range of issues, including the COSIMA model analyses; instrument development and deployment (incl. With ANU [Au]; UAdelaide [Au]; UMelbourne [Au]; Polar Research Institute of China [China]; Masdar Institute [UAE]), field projects (incl. AWI [Germany]; Univ Capetown [Sth Africa], Otago University [NZ]; NASA [USA]), Best Practices in data acquisition and analyses (incl. SCAR/ASPeCt; SCAR/AFIN; IPAB; WMO’s Global Cryosphere Watch; WCRP WDAC; ESA; International Ice Charting Working Group). 

Sea ice from above 2 - Credit Jan Lieser.jpg

LAURA HERRAIZ-BORREGUERO
Research Scientist

E: laura.herraizborreguero@csiro.au

  CSIRO Profile

About Laura & AAPP Involvement:

Laura Herraiz-Borreguero is a Research Scientist at CSIRO and a member of the Southern Ocean observations and change project team at the Centre for Southern Hemisphere Oceans Research. Dr Herraiz-Borreguero received her PhD in physical oceanography in 2010 from the University of Tasmania. Before joining CSIRO in June 2018, Dr Herraiz-Borreguero was a Marie Curie Research Fellow at the University of Southampton, UK. During this time, her research evolved from open ocean/large scale physical processes in the ocean to polar oceanography and Ice shelf-ocean interactions. From 2014 to 2016, Dr Herraiz-Borreguero worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Ice and Climate in Copenhagen, Denmark and from 2010 to 2013, she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC in Hobart, Tasmania. She led several papers on the coupling of the ocean with the Amery Ice Shelf, East Antarctica. This work used a unique set of observations from boreholes drilled through the ice shelf by the Australian Antarctic Division’s AMISOR project.

Laura provides feedback on field campaigns and contributes to AAPP Themes 1 and 2. She works on Southern Ocean change using observations, and on the interaction of the ocean with ice shelves around Antarctica.

About Laura & AAPP Involvement:

Laura Herraiz-Borreguero is a Research Scientist at CSIRO and a member of the Southern Ocean observations and change project team at the Centre for Southern Hemisphere Oceans Research. Dr Herraiz-Borreguero received her PhD in physical oceanography in 2010 from the University of Tasmania. Before joining CSIRO in June 2018, Dr Herraiz-Borreguero was a Marie Curie Research Fellow at the University of Southampton, UK. During this time, her research evolved from open ocean/large scale physical processes in the ocean to polar oceanography and Ice shelf-ocean interactions. From 2014 to 2016, Dr Herraiz-Borreguero worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Ice and Climate in Copenhagen, Denmark and from 2010 to 2013, she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC in Hobart, Tasmania. She led several papers on the coupling of the ocean with the Amery Ice Shelf, East Antarctica. This work used a unique set of observations from boreholes drilled through the ice shelf by the Australian Antarctic Division’s AMISOR project.

Laura provides feedback on field campaigns and contributes to AAPP Themes 1 and 2. She works on Southern Ocean change using observations, and on the interaction of the ocean with ice shelves around Antarctica.

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RUHI HUMPHRIES
Research Scientist

E: ruhi.humphries@csiro.au

   CSIRO Profile

About Ruhi & AAPP Involvement:

Ruhi's work within AAPP revolves around increasing our understanding of atmospheric aerosols in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica. This is done using ongoing measurements from the RV Investigator and Cape Grim as well as a range of intensive field campaigns at Antarctic research stations and aboard various ship-based platforms. The goal is to close the gap in our understanding of the sources, sinks, chemistry and physics of aerosols in the region, which has been driven primarily by the dearth of measurements in the past. Because aerosols are key to the radiative balance, as well as cloud formation and properties, Ruhi collaborates closely with cloud researchers at AAD and the BoM.

About Kate & AAPP Involvement:

Ruhi's work within AAPP revolves around increasing our understanding of atmospheric aerosols in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica. This is done using ongoing measurements from the RV Investigator and Cape Grim as well as a range of intensive field campaigns at Antarctic research stations and aboard various ship-based platforms. The goal is to close the gap in our understanding of the sources, sinks, chemistry and physics of aerosols in the region, which has been driven primarily by the dearth of measurements in the past. Because aerosols are key to the radiative balance, as well as cloud formation and properties, Ruhi collaborates closely with cloud researchers at AAD and the BoM.

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LENNEKE JONG
Glaciologist – Ice Cores/Palaeoclimate

E: lenneke.jong@awe.gov.au

Social Links

          

About Lenneke & AAPP Involvement:

Lenneke's research uses climate records from ice cores drilled across East Antarctica and numerical methods to improve our understanding of the variability of snow accumulation across Antarctica and how this relates to the other climate data recorded within the cores. Improving our understanding of spatial and temporal variability of snow accumulation records from in the interior of Antarctica will help to inform our analysis and interpretation of data from the million year ice core which AAD plans to drill, to answer questions about Antarctic mass balance and ice sheet stability.

🔗 View Lenneke's AAD Profile Page

About Lenneke & AAPP Involvement:

Lenneke's research uses climate records from ice cores drilled across East Antarctica and numerical methods to improve our understanding of the variability of snow accumulation across Antarctica and how this relates to the other climate data recorded within the cores. Improving our understanding of spatial and temporal variability of snow accumulation records from in the interior of Antarctica will help to inform our analysis and interpretation of data from the million year ice core which AAD plans to drill, to answer questions about Antarctic mass balance and ice sheet stability.

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SO KAWAGUCHI
Krill Ecologist

E: So.Kawaguchi@awe.gov.au

   AAD Profile

About So & AAPP Involvement:

So is a Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Antarctic Division and lead the krill research. His research focuses on various aspects of Antarctic krill biology and ecology including studies into climate change impacts on krill. So's involvement in AAPP is through Project 7 (Krill and Ecosystems) as a krill ecologist.

About So & AAPP Involvement:

So is a Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Antarctic Division and lead the krill research. His research focuses on various aspects of Antarctic krill biology and ecology including studies into climate change impacts on krill. So's involvement in AAPP is through Project 7 (Krill and Ecosystems) as a krill ecologist.

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MELITA KEYWOOD
Co Theme Leader (Theme 1) 

E: melita.keywood@csiro.au

   CSIRO Profile

About Melita & AAPP Involvement:

Melita’s research expertise lies in the chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol which she uses in a variety of applications ranging from tracking long term changes in aerosol microphysics and chemical composition of the remote marine boundary layer, to understanding aerosol growth and secondary organic aerosol in urban airsheds and biomass burning plumes.

Besides the role of co-Theme Leader for Theme 1, Melita will also contribute to the research being carried out in Project 1 (Atmospheres), with a focus on interpreting aerosol data sets collected during several voyages in the Southern Ocean since 2015.

About Melita & AAPP Involvement:

Melita’s research expertise lies in the chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol which she uses in a variety of applications ranging from tracking long term changes in aerosol microphysics and chemical composition of the remote marine boundary layer, to understanding aerosol growth and secondary organic aerosol in urban airsheds and biomass burning plumes.

Besides the role of co-Theme Leader for Theme 1, Melita will also contribute to the research being carried out in Project 1 (Atmospheres), with a focus on interpreting aerosol data sets collected during several voyages in the Southern Ocean since 2015.

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ROB KING
Krill Biologist

E:  rob.king@awe.gov.au

   AAD Profile

About Rob & AAPP Involvement:

Rob is a Marine Research Facility Specialist at the Australian Antarctic Division working primarily in the krill research program.  His research focuses on various aspects of Antarctic krill biology and ecology including studies into climate change impacts on krill. Rob's involvement in AAPP is through Project 7 (Krill and Ecosystems) as a krill biologist.

About Rob & AAPP Involvement:

Rob is a Marine Research Facility Specialist at the Australian Antarctic Division working primarily in the krill research program.  His research focuses on various aspects of Antarctic krill biology and ecology including studies into climate change impacts on krill. Rob's involvement in AAPP is through Project 7 (Krill and Ecosystems) as a krill biologist.

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JOHN KITCHENER
Research Scientist

E: john.kitchener@aad.gov.au

Social Links

Current AAPP Activities:

John's involvement within the AAPP is through Theme 3 “The future of sea-ice krill and ecosystems”, Project 7 “Krill and Ecosystems” as a zooplankton taxonomist, looking at samples from the CPR and other sources.

Current AAPP Activities:

John's involvement within the AAPP is through Theme 3 “The future of sea-ice krill and ecosystems”, Project 7 “Krill and Ecosystems” as a zooplankton taxonomist, looking at samples from the CPR and other sources.

More about John

Biography

I am a zooplankton taxonomist at the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) within the Southern Ocean Ecosystems and Monitoring group, part of the Marine Conservation and Management program. 

I commenced full-time work on the Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR) program in 1997. As Antarctic plankton are expected to be sensitive and vulnerable to climate change, SO-CPR was established in 1991 by the AAD as a monitoring program on krill and zooplankton. It provides sustained fundamental observations on variation in plankton biodiversity, distribution and abundance to detect and assess potential effects of climate change at the base of the food web. These observations underpin other research for management of the region. SO-CPR is a recognised international monitoring facility, supported by several nations and supports other Antarctic and international monitoring programs.

The overall aim of this research is to provide and maintain a long-term and geographically extensive plankton observing system producing high quality data on plankton biodiversity in order to understand seasonal, annual and long-term ecological changes in the marine ecosystem, and to deliver scientific evidence needed to inform scientists, governments and society of changes into the health and biodiversity of the Southern Ocean.

After graduating from the University of Tasmania with a B.Sc. (Hons.) majoring in Zoology, I was approached by the AAD inviting me to tender for a contract as a fish/krill biologist for a major marine science voyage to Prydz Bay in Antarctica. During the next few years (and a few contracts/voyages) I juggled several biological duties researching krill, fish and finally settling on zooplankton, in particular from the CPR, a role I have performed since 1997.

My current tasks are that of a zooplankton analyst and CPR operations manager within the AAD. This has led to my participation (so far) in 22 expedition voyages to Antarctica and return, mostly aboard the Aurora Australis (19 voyages) and I also have spent 2 major campaigns onboard Polarstern (Germany) as part of international collaboration. Of my voyages, about half have been dedicated marine science expeditions; the remaining I have conducted underway marine sampling onboard resupply cruises.

It is also envisaged that underway plankton sampling (including the CPR) will continue in the Southern Ocean for all voyages on RSV Nuyina once it is commissioned. This long term data set will continue to provide insight into the effects of environmental change on food webs.

Scientific Committee Memberships

Deputy Chair of SCAR EG-CPR (2014 - present): SCAR Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder Database (SO-CPR)
Member of GACS Standards & Methodologies Advisory Group (SMAG) (2014 - present): Global Alliance of CPR Surveys

Selected Publications

Hosie, G., Mormède, S., Kitchener, J., Takahashi, K., Raymond, B (2014) Chapter 10.3. Near-surface zooplankton community. In: De Broyer C., Koubbi P., Griffiths H.J., Raymond B., Udekem d’Acoz C. d’, Van de Putte A.P., Danis B., David B., Grant S., Gutt J., Held C., Hosie G., Huettmann F., Post A., Ropert-Coudert Y. (eds.), The CAML/SCAR-MarBIN Biogeographic Atlas of the Southern Ocean. Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, Cambridge, pp. 422-430.
McLeod, D.J., Hosie, G.W., Kitchener, J.A., Takahashi, K.T., Hunt, B.P.V. (2010) Zooplankton Atlas of the Southern Ocean: The SCAR SO-CPR Survey (1991-2008). Polar Science 4. 353-385
Batten Sonia D., Abu-Alhaija Rana, Chiba Sanae, Edwards Martin, Graham George, Jyothibabu R., Kitchener John A., Koubbi Philippe, McQuatters-Gollop Abigail, Muxagata Erik, Ostle Clare, Richardson Anthony J., Robinson Karen V., Takahashi Kunio T., Verheye Hans M., Wilson Willie (2019): A Global Plankton Diversity Monitoring Program. Frontiers in Marine Science. 6, 321pp, DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00321
Deagle, B.E., Clarke, L.J., Kitchener, J.A., Polanowski, A.M., Davidson, A.T. (2017) Genetic monitoring of open ocean biodiversity: An evaluation of DNA metabarcoding for processing continuous plankton recorder samples. Molecular Ecology Resources, 2017;00:1-16. https://doi.org/10.1111/1755-0998.12740

Associated links

Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey (SO-CPR Survey)

Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey [observational]

Andrew Klekociuk

About Andrew & AAPP Involvement:

At the Australian Antarctic Division Andrew undertakes research on the polar atmosphere, including the evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole, polar middle atmospheric dynamics and processes associated with climate variability. He brings experience to the AAPP with in situ and remote sensing techniques for investigating cloud, aerosol and radiation processes. This includes development and operation of lidar for the measurement of cloud and aerosol properties, and use of surface data to characterize the radiation environment over the Southern Ocean. Andrew also has research interests in the use and development of high resolution numerical climate and weather modelling, and atmospheric trajectory analysis.

About Andrew & AAPP Involvement:

At the Australian Antarctic Division Andrew undertakes research on the polar atmosphere, including the evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole, polar middle atmospheric dynamics and processes associated with climate variability. He brings experience to the AAPP with in situ and remote sensing techniques for investigating cloud, aerosol and radiation processes. This includes development and operation of lidar for the measurement of cloud and aerosol properties, and use of surface data to characterize the radiation environment over the Southern Ocean. Andrew also has research interests in the use and development of high resolution numerical climate and weather modelling, and atmospheric trajectory analysis.

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ROB MASSOM
Senior Research Scientist

E: rob.massom@awe.gov.au

 AAD Profile

Social Links

      

Current AAPP Activities:

Dr Massom’s current AAPP activities (involving close collaboration with AAPP and external colleagues) relate to:

  • Combining satellite, model and other data to determine how, where and why large-scale patterns of Antarctic sea ice coverage and seasonality are changing and varying;
  • Satellite mapping of coastal landfast sea ice (fast ice), change and variability in its coverage, and its regional and seasonal patterns; and
  • Investigating linkages between sea ice (both fast and pack ice) and coastal ice sheet processes, including iceberg calving.

Current AAPP Activities:

Dr Massom’s current AAPP activities (involving close collaboration with AAPP and external colleagues) relate to:

Combining satellite, model and other data to determine how, where and why large-scale patterns of Antarctic sea ice coverage and seasonality are changing and varying;
Satellite mapping of coastal landfast sea ice (fast ice), change and variability in its coverage, and its regional and seasonal patterns; and
Investigating linkages between sea ice (both fast and pack ice) and coastal ice sheet processes, including iceberg calving.

More about Rob

Biography

Dr Rob Massom is a senior sea-ice research scientist working within both the Antarctic Climate Program of the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) and AAPP Project 6 Sea Ice.  His experience in sea-ice research involves both the Arctic (1980-92) and Antarctic (1986-present), including participation on 15 major field campaigns.  His strongly collaborative and cross-disciplinary work not only addresses the key research questions of AAPP Project 6 relating to determining how, where and why Antarctic sea ice is changing and varying, and what the physical and ecological consequences are. It also provides key sea ice-related input in support of research across all AAPP Themes on the ocean, atmosphere, krill and ecosystems, and ice shelves.  


Dr Massom’s current research interests are: 

the nature and drivers of large-scale change and variability in the distribution and properties of Antarctic sea ice (both moving pack and coastal fast ice);
the physical and ecological effects of sea ice change and variability (including extreme meteorological events);
carrying out field measurements in support of process studies, improving numerical modelling and the validation of satellite remote sensing data;
the thickness, properties and role of snow in the sea ice environment;
the measurement and monitoring of polar snow and ice properties and distribution using satellite and other remote sensing, and development of remote sensing techniques; 
Antarctic coastal processes and interactions between sea ice, icebergs and floating ice-sheet margins, including the role of sea ice (loss) in ice shelf stabilization (calving/break up); and
Antarctic coastal polynyas.  

Associated links

https://rmdb.research.utas.edu.au/public/rmdb/q/indiv_detail_warp_trans/1520

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KLAUS MEINERS
Co-Project Leader (Project 6)

E: klaus.meiners@aad.gov.au

   AAD Profile

https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=5yP11L4AAAAJ&hl=en&oi=sra

About Klaus & AAPP Involvement:

Klaus's research is directed at understanding the impacts of changing sea ice conditions on Antarctic marine ecosystems and Southern Ocean biogeochemical cycles. He is particularly interested in science that links sea ice physics, biogeochemistry and ecology. Contributing to AAPP, his current work focusses on understanding physical drivers of ice-associated algal production and the importance of sea ice as habitat for Antarctic krill. Klaus is also involved in the development of non-invasive (bio-optical) techniques to concomitantly measure sea-ice physical properties and ice algal biomass from moored platforms and underwater vehicles, aimed at up-scaling localised observations to inform the development and evaluation of sea-ice ecosystem models.

About Klaus & AAPP Involvement:

Klaus's research is directed at understanding the impacts of changing sea ice conditions on Antarctic marine ecosystems and Southern Ocean biogeochemical cycles. He is particularly interested in science that links sea ice physics, biogeochemistry and ecology. Contributing to AAPP, his current work focusses on understanding physical drivers of ice-associated algal production and the importance of sea ice as habitat for Antarctic krill. Klaus is also involved in the development of non-invasive (bio-optical) techniques to concomitantly measure sea-ice physical properties and ice algal biomass from moored platforms and underwater vehicles, aimed at up-scaling localised observations to inform the development and evaluation of sea-ice ecosystem models.

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Andrew Moy
Research Scientist

E:  andrew.moy@awe.gov.au

   AAD Profile

About Andrew & AAPP Involvement:

Andrew's research is focused on palaeoclimate - ‘past climate’. He has been lucky enough to work with national and international research teams that use ice core and marine sediment records that can be used to reconstruct past climate conditions.

Andrew's research contributes to the milestones, goals and deliverables for Project 2 at AAPP.

About Andrew & AAPP Involvement:

Andrew's research is focused on palaeoclimate - ‘past climate’. He has been lucky enough to work with national and international research teams that use ice core and marine sediment records that can be used to reconstruct past climate conditions.

Andrew's research contributes to the milestones, goals and deliverables for Project 2 at AAPP.

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DAMIAN MURPHY
Senior Research Scientist
(Atmospheric Physicist)

E:  damian.murphy@awe.gov.au

   AAD Profile

About Damian & AAPP Involvement:

Atmospheric radars have been a key element of Damian's research career and this continues to be true through his role in the operation of a wind profiler at Davis. This profiler measures the wind many times an hour up into the stratosphere and complements the Bureau of Meteorology’s radiosonde balloon measurements and forecasting capabilities. Radar data contributes to AAPP projects and feed into Damian's other research areas of small-scale waves in the atmosphere and their representation in climate models.

About Damian & AAPP Involvement:

Atmospheric radars have been a key element of Damian's research career and this continues to be true through his role in the operation of a wind profiler at Davis. This profiler measures the wind many times an hour up into the stratosphere and complements the Bureau of Meteorology’s radiosonde balloon measurements and forecasting capabilities. Radar data contributes to AAPP projects and feed into Damian's other research areas of small-scale waves in the atmosphere and their representation in climate models.

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SCOTT NICHOL
 AAPP Management Committee

E: scott.nichol@ga.gov.au

About Scott & AAPP Involvement:

Scott is a marine geomorphologist with a particular interest in continental margin, coastal, and estuarine systems.  His research themes include reconstructions of shelf to slope depositional histories, impacts of extreme events (tsunami) on sedimentation processes, and interaction of physical and biological processes. He has a strong emphasis on field-based empirical and interdisciplinary research, with published studies from projects in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, US, Ireland and the Maldives. Scott is a member of the AAPP Management Committee, representing Geoscience Australia as an associate partner.

About Scott & AAPP Involvement:

Scott is a marine geomorphologist with a particular interest in continental margin, coastal, and estuarine systems.  His research themes include reconstructions of shelf to slope depositional histories, impacts of extreme events (tsunami) on sedimentation processes, and interaction of physical and biological processes. He has a strong emphasis on field-based empirical and interdisciplinary research, with published studies from projects in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, US, Ireland and the Maldives. Scott is a member of the AAPP Management Committee, representing Geoscience Australia as an associate partner.

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ABRAHAM PASSMORE
Technician 

E: abraham.passmore@csiro.au

About Abraham & AAPP Involvement:

Abraham organises the collection of seawater samples on Antarctic voyages to track ocean carbon dioxide levels. He analyses the samples for alkalinity and total CO2 either on the ship or in the CSIRO ocean carbon laboratory in Hobart, using instrumentation and certified reference materials to ensure high precision analytical results.

About Abraham & AAPP Involvement:

Abraham organises the collection of seawater samples on Antarctic voyages to track ocean carbon dioxide levels. He analyses the samples for alkalinity and total CO2 either on the ship or in the CSIRO ocean carbon laboratory in Hobart, using instrumentation and certified reference materials to ensure high precision analytical results.

Sea ice from above 2 - Credit Jan Lieser.jpg

JOEL PEDRO
Research Scientist

E: joel.pedro@aad.gov.au

Social Links

      

Current AAPP Activities:

Contributing to Project 2: Ice Cores in AAPP Theme 1: Antarctica’s Influence on Climate and Sea Level.

Planning and coordination of Million Year Ice Core Project science in order to deliver key Project 2 Objectives:

  1. What does the ice core record of past climate and carbon dioxide concentrations spanning more than 800,000 years reveal about climate and climate-carbon feedbacks? 
  2. How did the partitioning of carbon between different sinks (ocean, terrestrial, atmosphere) change (in volumes and rates) in the past (as resolved by isotopes of CO2 and CH4)?
  3. What are the implications for future climate, sea-level and ice sheet stability that emerge from the oldest ice record, and what do past interglacial conditions indicate as potential analogues of future warming?
  4. What does the record of recent millennia show for key environmental parameters and climate forcings? (e.g. snow accumulation, sea-ice, aerosols, dust, volcanism, solar activity and greenhouse gases)

Current AAPP Activities:

Contributing to Project 2: Ice Cores in AAPP Theme 1: Antarctica’s Influence on Climate and Sea Level.

Planning and coordination of Million Year Ice Core Project science in order to deliver key Project 2 Objectives:

  1. What does the ice core record of past climate and carbon dioxide concentrations spanning more than 800,000 years reveal about climate and climate-carbon feedbacks? 
  2. How did the partitioning of carbon between different sinks (ocean, terrestrial, atmosphere) change (in volumes and rates) in the past (as resolved by isotopes of CO2 and CH4)?
  3. What are the implications for future climate, sea-level and ice sheet stability that emerge from the oldest ice record, and what do past interglacial conditions indicate as potential analogues of future warming?
  4. What does the record of recent millennia show for key environmental parameters and climate forcings? (e.g. snow accumulation, sea-ice, aerosols, dust, volcanism, solar activity and greenhouse gases)
More about Joel

Biography

I work for the Australian Antarctic Division as the Lead Project Scientist in the Million Year Ice Core (MYIC) Project. The MYIC Project aims to find, drill, analyse and interpret the climate records from Antarctica’s oldest ice and to help to solve major open questions on climate-carbon cycle-cryosphere feedbacks involved in the Earth’s ice age cycles.

The ice age cycles are the defining feature of the past several million years of Earth’s climate history. The scale of transformation of the Earth system across the ice ages is immense: they dominate millennial scale variability in carbon cycling, sea level, ice sheet size and distribution and even human migration and evolution. While there is a consensus that cyclic changes in the Earth’s orbit are involved in forcing the ice ages we still lack an understanding of the feedback processes which amplify such small orbital signals into such profound Earth system changes. 

The MYIC will nearly double the age of the existing oldest ice core record, reaching back beyond 1.2 million years ago to a period where the ice age cycles became faster and less intense. The data on climate and environmental conditions preserved in the ice is needed to resolve why this change of pacing occurred and to help answer larger open questions about climate, carbon cycle cryosphere feedbacks. This research contributes to AAPP Theme 2: Antarctica’s influence on climate and sea level.

I received a PhD in ice core Paleoclimatology from the University of Tasmania in 2012. Prior to being appointed to the AAD I held postdoc positions at leading US and European ice core laboratories. The University of Washington and the University of Copenhagen. I have participated in ice core field campaigns in Antarctica, Greenland, the Canadian Rockies and the sub Antarctic islands. I love my job! 

I hail from the Great Southern of Western Australia and enjoy going back to the family farm.

Awards / Grants

Uwe Radok Award 2013
JISAO Fellowship 2013– University of Washington
Marie Curie Fellowship 2014– University Copenhagen
Co-Investigator: Did a previous collapse of the Antarctic Ice Sheet cause abrupt climate change in the Southern Hemisphere? Marsden Fund, New Zealand, 2018-onging.
Co-Investigator: Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition, Sub-Antarctic Ice Core Expedition (subICE), Australia, UK, US, Swiss, 2016–ongoing.

Selected Publications

Pedro, J. B., M. Jochum, F. He, C. Buizert, S. Barker and S. O. Rasmussen, Invited review: Beyond the bipolar seesaw: Toward a process understanding of inter-hemispheric coupling, Quat. Sci. Rev., 192, 27–46, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2018.05.005, 2018
Buizert, C., M. Sigl, M. Severi, B. R. Markle, J. R. McConnell, J. B. Pedro, J. Wettstein, H. Sodemann, K. Goto-Azuma, K. Kawamura, S. Fujita, H. Motoyama, M. Hirabayashi, R. Uemura, B. Stenni, F. Parrenin, L. Gest, F. He, T.J. Fudge and E. Steig: The Southern Westerlies and Antarctic Climate during the Last Ice Age, Nature, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0727-5, 563, 681-685, 2018.
Strugnell, J. M., Pedro, J. B., Wilson, N. G. Dating Antarctic ice sheet collapse: Proposing a molecular genetic approach, Quat. Sci. Rev., 179, 153–157, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2017.11.014, 2018.
Markle, B. R., E. J. Steig, C. Buizert, S. W. Schonenman C. M. Bitz, T. J. Fudge, J. B. Pedro, Q. Ding, T. Jones, J. W. C. White and T. Sowers, Atmospheric teleconnections between the tropics and high southern latitudes during abrupt climate change, Nature Geosci., 10, 36–40, https://doi.org/doi:10.1038/ngeo2848, 2017.
Pedro, J. B., H. C. Bostock, C. M. Bitz, F. He, M. J. Vandergoes, E. J. Steig, B. M. Chase, C. E. Krause, S. O. Rasmussen, B. R. Markle and G. Cortese, The spatial extent and dynamics of the Antarctic Cold Reversal, Nature Geosci., 9, 51-55, https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2580, 2016.

AlixPostInvestigator (2)

ALIX POST
Marine Geoscientist

E: alix.post@ga.gov.au

Social Links

      

Current AAPP Activities:

As part of her contribution to the AAPP, Alix will be focussing on interpreting and collecting high resolution multibeam bathymetry data. To help focus research efforts she will first undertake a bathymetry gap analysis to inform future field campaigns. Collection of seafloor bathymetry will contribute to:

  • interpretation of seafloor geomorphology and past ice sheet processes;
  • application of bathymetry data to inform oceanographic processes and pathways for ocean circulation.
  • understanding seafloor habitats and the distribution of seafloor ecosystems.

Current AAPP Activities:

As part of her contribution to the AAPP, Alix will be focussing on interpreting and collecting high resolution multibeam bathymetry data. To help focus research efforts she will first undertake a bathymetry gap analysis to inform future field campaigns. Collection of seafloor bathymetry will contribute to:

  • interpretation of seafloor geomorphology and past ice sheet processes;
  • application of bathymetry data to inform oceanographic processes and pathways for ocean circulation.
  • understanding seafloor habitats and the distribution of seafloor ecosystems.
More about Alix

Biography

Alix is a marine geoscientist focussed on understanding seafloor environments. In her research she uses seafloor bathymetry, sediment samples and imagery to understanding past and present marine, glacial, oceanographic and biological processes. Her research has contributed to understanding seafloor habitats around the Antarctic margin, including marine protected area planning.

As part of her work with the AAPP she is particularly interested in interpreting glacial features revealed by high resolution multibeam bathymetry to understand past styles of ice sheet advance and retreat across the Antarctic continental shelf. These datasets can also inform a range of other applications, including understanding pathways for ocean circulation and the distribution of seafloor habitats.

Alix completed a PhD within the Institute of Antarctic and Southern Ocean Studies at the University of Tasmania in 2004. She has worked at Geoscience Australia in Canberra since 2002. She has worked on the continental shelf and within slope canyons from the northern tropics of Australia, through the temperate regions and south to the pole. She has sailed on 11 research voyages, with 3 to the Antarctic margin.

Scientific Committee Memberships

Australian representative, Geoscience Science Group, Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR) (2018 – present)

Awards / Grants

Endeavour Executive Leadership Award (2019)
RV Investigator voyage IN2022_V01: Antarctic Bottom Water production in the past: Records from marine sediments, Cape Darnley, East Antarctica (Chief Scientist)
Australian Antarctic Science Project 4333: Interactions of the Totten Glacier with the Southern Ocean through multiple glacial cycles (Co-Investigator)
Australian Antarctic Science Project 4320: Characterising East Antarctic seabed habitats. A. Post. 2014-2020 (Chief Investigator)
Australian Antarctic Science Project 4392: Shallow water bathymetric mapping using high-resolution multispectral satellite imagery (Co-Investigator)

Selected Publications

Post, A., O'Brien, P., Edwards, S., Carroll, A., Malakoff, K., Armand, L., 2020. Upper slope processes and seafloor ecosystems on the Sabrina continental slope, East Antarctica. Marine Geology 422, 106091.
O'Brien, P., Post, A., Edwards, S., Martin, T., Caburlotto, A., Donda, F., Leitchenkov, G., Romeo, R., Duffy, M., Evangelinos, D., Holder, L., Leventer, A., López Quirós, A., Opdyke, B., Armand, L., 2020. Continental slope and rise geomorphology seaward of the Totten Glacier, East Antarctica (112°E-122°E). Marine Geology 427, 106221.
Smith, J.A., Graham, A.G.C., Post, A.L., Hillenbrand, C.D., Bart, P.J., Powell, R.D., 2019. The marine geological imprint of Antarctic ice shelves. Nature Communications 10, 5635.
Post, A.L., Lavoie, C., Domack, E.W., Leventer, A., Shevenell, A., Fraser, A.D., 2017. Environmental drivers of benthic communities and habitat heterogeneity on an East Antarctic shelf. Antarctic Science 29, 17-32.
Carson, C.J., Post, A.L., Smith, J., Walker, G., Waring, P., Bartley, R., Raymond, B., 2017. The seafloor geomorphology of the Windmill Islands, Wilkes Land, East Antarctica: Evidence of Law Dome ice margin dynamics. Geomorphology 292, 1-15.

Associated links

NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub

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ALAIN PROTAT
Co-Project Leader (Project 1)

E: alain.protat@bom.gov.au

Social Links

   

Current AAPP Activities:

  • Analysis of Southern Ocean precipitation properties using shipborne disdrometer observations from the OceanRAIN program
  • Analysis of cloud-radiation interactions over the Southern Ocean using cloud radar, lidar, and surface radiation observations
  • Development of high-resolution numerical weather prediction simulations with ACCESS-C for all the recent observational campaigns.
  • ACCESS-C model evaluation to better understand underlying causes of the surface radiation biases found in several models over the Southern Ocean and around Antarctica
  • Co-supervision of two AAPP post-docs on understanding cloud-radiation-precipitation-radiation interactions and inform future model sensitivity tests to improve ACCESS (Marc Mallet) and on ACCESS model improvements of the representation of the aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions (Sonya Fiddes).
  • Co-leadership of the atmospheric component of AAPP (Theme 1 – Project 1)

Current AAPP Activities:

  • Analysis of Southern Ocean precipitation properties using shipborne disdrometer observations from the OceanRAIN program
  • Analysis of cloud-radiation interactions over the Southern Ocean using cloud radar, lidar, and surface radiation observations
  • Development of high-resolution numerical weather prediction simulations with ACCESS-C for all the recent observational campaigns.
  • ACCESS-C model evaluation to better understand underlying causes of the surface radiation biases found in several models over the Southern Ocean and around Antarctica
  • Co-supervision of two AAPP post-docs on understanding cloud-radiation-precipitation-radiation interactions and inform future model sensitivity tests to improve ACCESS (Marc Mallet) and on ACCESS model improvements of the representation of the aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions (Sonya Fiddes).
  • Co-leadership of the atmospheric component of AAPP (Theme 1 – Project 1)
More about Alain

Biography

At the Bureau of Meteorology, I work in the Science and Innovation Group, Weather and Environmental Prediction Program, where I lead the "Radar Science and Nowcasting" Team. The core of my research is to use radars at different frequencies and on different platforms (ground, ship, aircraft, satellite) to better understand cloud and convection (storms) processes. This better understanding of clouds and convection is then exploited to evaluate and improve satellite products and the representation of clouds and convection in numerical weather prediction and climate models.

In AAPP, my role is to co-lead the Atmospheric component (Theme 1 – Project 1), and my main objectives are to analyse the numerous observations we have collected since 2016 to better understand aerosol-cloud-radiation-precipitation processes and inform the development of improved parameterizations of these processes in the Australian Climate model (ACCESS-CM2).

Selected Publications

McFarquhar, G. M.,, C. Bretherton, R. Marchand, A. Protat, P. J. DeMott, S. P. Alexander, G. C. Roberts, C. H. Twohy, D. Toohey, S. Siems, Y. Huang, R. Wood, R. M. Rauber, S. Lasher-Trapp, J. Jensen, J. Stith, G. G. Mace, J. Um, E. Järvinen, M. Schnaiter, A. Gettelman, K. J. Sanchez, C. S. McCluskey, L. M. Russell, I. L. McCoy, R. Atlas, C. G. Bardeen, K. A. Moore, T. C. J. Hill, R. S. Humphries, M. D. Keywood, Z. Ristovski, L. Cravigan, R. Schofield, C. Fairall, M. D. Mallet, S. M. Kreidenweis, B. Rainwater, J. D’Alessandro, Y. Wang, W. Wu, G. Saliba, E. J. T. Levin, S. Ding, F. Lang, S. C.H. Truong, C. Wolff, J. Haggerty, M. J. Harvey, A. Klekociuk and A. McDonald, 2020: Observations of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, and surface radiation over the Southern Ocean: An overview of CAPRICORN, MARCUS, MICRE and SOCRATES. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Accepted with minor revisions, August2020.
Protat, A., C. Klepp, V. Louf, W. Petersen, S. P. Alexander, A. Barros, and G. G. Mace, 2019: The latitudinal variability of oceanic rainfall properties and its implication for satellite retrievals. Part 1: The Latitudinal Variability of Drop Size Distribution Properties & Part 2: The Relationships between Radar Observables and Drop Size Distribution Parameters. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 124, 13291-13311, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JD031010.
Alexander, S. P., and A. Protat, 2018: Southern Ocean cloud properties as observed from the surface and satellite. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 123. https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JD026552.
Mace, G. G., and A. Protat, 2018: Clouds over the Southern Ocean as observed from the RV Investigator during CAPRICORN. Part 1: Cloud occurrence and phase partitioning. J. Appl. Meteor. Clim.. 57, 1783-1803.
Protat, A., E. Schulz, L. Rikus, Z. Sun, and Y. Xiao, 2017: Shipborne observations of the radiative effect of Southern Ocean Clouds. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 122, 318-328.

Associated links

BoM Research

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BEN RAYMOND
Principal Research Scientist 

Social Links

About Ben & AAPP Involvement:

Ben undertakes cross-disciplinary integration and syntheses of data, including analysis, modelling, and visualization, applied to the Southern Ocean and Antarctica.

About Ben & AAPP Involvement:

Ben undertakes cross-disciplinary integration and syntheses of data, including analysis, modelling, and visualization, applied to the Southern Ocean and Antarctica.

Steve Rintoul

STEVE RINTOUL
Co-Theme Leader (Theme 2)

E: steve.rintoul@csiro.au

Social Links

Current AAPP Activities:

I am co-leader of Theme 2: Nature and Consequences of Southern Ocean Change and contribute to Project 4.

I carry out Southern Ocean observations, including repeat hydrography and process studies from ships, Argo and Deep Argo floats, moorings in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and on the Antarctic continental shelf, and satellite data. I work with colleagues and students on analysis of numerical simulations used to investigate Southern Ocean dynamics and atmosphere-ocean-cryosphere interactions.

Current AAPP Activities:

I am co-leader of Theme 2: Nature and Consequences of Southern Ocean Change and contribute to Project 4.

I carry out Southern Ocean observations, including repeat hydrography and process studies from ships, Argo and Deep Argo floats, moorings in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and on the Antarctic continental shelf, and satellite data. I work with colleagues and students on analysis of numerical simulations used to investigate Southern Ocean dynamics and atmosphere-ocean-cryosphere interactions.

More about Steve

Biography

Dr Stephen Rintoul is a physical oceanographer with a long-standing interest in the Southern Ocean and its role in the earth system. His research has contributed to a deeper appreciation of the influence of the Southern Ocean on regional and global climate, biogeochemical cycles and biological productivity. Born in the USA, he did his graduate studies at the MIT-WHOI Joint Program and postdoctoral work at Princeton before moving to Australia to take up a position at the CSIRO. His scientific interests include the dynamics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Ocean overturning circulation, water mass formation, and the influence of Southern Ocean currents on biology and biogeochemistry. Primarily an observational oceanographer, he has led 15 expeditions to the Southern, Indian and Pacific Oceans. Over the past 30 years, Dr Rintoul has co-chaired international panels responsible for major climate research programs carried out in the Southern Ocean. He led the Climate of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean program of the International Polar Year and led the development of the Southern Ocean Observing System. He was a Coordinating Lead Author of the Oceans chapter in the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). His scientific achievements have been recognised by many national and international awards.

Scientific Committee Memberships

International Science Panel, New Zealand Antarctic Research Institute

Awards / Grants

2019 Tasmanian Premier’s STEM Research of the Year
2012 Australian Antarctic Medal
2012 Martha T Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica
2010 W. S. Jardetzky Medal & Lecture, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, USA
2005 Georg Wüst Prize, German Society for Marine Research

Selected Publications

Silvano, A., A. Foppert, S. R. Rintoul, P. R. Holland, T. Tamura, N. Kimura, P. Castagno, P. Falco, G. Budillon, F. A. Haumann, A. Naveira Garabato and A. Macdonald, 2020. Recovery of Antarctic Bottom Water formation in the Ross Sea driven by climate anomalies. Nature Geoscience, in press.
Rintoul, S. R., 2018. Global influence of localized dynamics in the Southern Ocean. Nature, 558, 209-218, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0182-3
Rintoul, S. R., S. L. Chown, R. DeConto, M. H. England, H. Fricker, V. Masson-Delmotte, T. Naish, M. Siegert and J. C. Xavier, Choosing the future of Antarctica. Nature, 588, 233-241, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0173-4
Rintoul, S. R., A. Silvano, B. Pena-Molino, E. van Wijk, M. Rosenberg, J. S Greenbaum, D. D. Blankenship, 2016. Ocean heat drives rapid basal melt of Totten Ice Shelf. Science Advances, 2, e1601610, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601610
Rintoul, S. R., 2007. Rapid freshening of Antarctic Bottom Water formed in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Geophysical Research Letters, 34, L06606, doi:10.1029/2006GL028550

Elizabeth Shadwick

ELIZABETH SHADWICK
Co-Project Leader (Project 5)

E:  elizabeth.shadwick@csiro.au

   CSIRO Profile

About Elizabeth & AAPP Involvement:

Elizabeth is a marine biogeochemist interested in distinguishing between natural and anthropogenic variability in the ocean. She is particularly interested in the carbon cycle and ocean acidification. Her research relies on conventional ship board sampling as well as autonomous platforms and biogeochemical models. Elizabeth is the Co-Leader of the IMOS Southern Ocean Time Series (SOTS) Facility and maintains a moored observatory on the continental shelf of the West Antarctic Peninsula. Elizabeth has an ongoing interest in monitoring the changing biogeochemistry of the East Antarctic Coastal region.

About Elizabeth & AAPP Involvement:

Elizabeth is a marine biogeochemist interested in distinguishing between natural and anthropogenic variability in the ocean. She is particularly interested in the carbon cycle and ocean acidification. Her research relies on conventional ship board sampling as well as autonomous platforms and biogeochemical models. Elizabeth is the Co-Leader of the IMOS Southern Ocean Time Series (SOTS) Facility and maintains a moored observatory on the continental shelf of the West Antarctic Peninsula. Elizabeth has an ongoing interest in monitoring the changing biogeochemistry of the East Antarctic Coastal region.

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JODIE SMITH
Marine Geoscientist

E: jodie.smith@ga.gov.au

Social Links

      

 

About Jodie & AAPP Involvement:

Jodie's research involves mapping and understanding the physical seafloor environment around the Antarctic margin, including bathymetry, geomorphic features, sediment characteristics, seafloor habitats and benthic communities. Her work spans from the shallow coastal waters to the continental shelf and slope and into the deep ocean.

In the AAPP, Jodie will provide fundamental seafloor information to better understand ocean-ice interactions and marine ecosystems. This includes:

  • Identifying pathways of ocean circulation
  • Revealing patterns of ice sheet advance and retreat
  • Determining the distribution of iceberg grounding and their effect on regional ice dynamics
  • Compiling baseline data on marine ecosystems for monitoring and assessing future change
  • Identifying physical drivers controlling the distribution of biological communities
  • Predicting the impacts of changing ice dynamics on benthic communities.

About Jodie & AAPP Involvement:

Jodie's research involves mapping and understanding the physical seafloor environment around the Antarctic margin, including bathymetry, geomorphic features, sediment characteristics, seafloor habitats and benthic communities. Her work spans from the shallow coastal waters to the continental shelf and slope and into the deep ocean.

In the AAPP, Jodie will provide fundamental seafloor information to better understand ocean-ice interactions and marine ecosystems. This includes:

  • Identifying pathways of ocean circulation
  • Revealing patterns of ice sheet advance and retreat
  • Determining the distribution of iceberg grounding and their effect on regional ice dynamics
  • Compiling baseline data on marine ecosystems for monitoring and assessing future change
  • Identifying physical drivers controlling the distribution of biological communities
  • Predicting the impacts of changing ice dynamics on benthic communities.
Sea ice from above 2 - Credit Jan Lieser.jpg

MICHAEL SUMNER
Software & Database Engineer

E: Michael.Sumner@awe.gov.au

Social Links

   

About Michael & AAPP Involvement:

Michael write software for accessing environmental data and integrating it with ecosystem models, a conduit for modelling approaches in “Links to sea ice and BGC”.

About Michael & AAPP Involvement:

Michael write software for accessing environmental data and integrating it with ecosystem models, a conduit for modelling approaches in “Links to sea ice and BGC”.

Sea ice from above 2 - Credit Jan Lieser.jpg

BRONTE TILBROOK
Senior Principal Research Scientist

E:  bronte.tilbrook@csiro.au

Social Links

Current AAPP Activities:

Resolving ocean carbon uptake and variability and ocean acidification.

Current AAPP Activities:

Resolving ocean carbon uptake and variability and ocean acidification.

More about Bronte

Biography

Dr. Bronte Tilbrook is a biogeochemist based in Hobart, Australia, with CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere and the Australian Antarctic Partnership Program. He graduated in 1992 with a PhD in chemical oceanography from the University of Hawaii.

Tilbrook leads projects that have established Australia's ocean observing system for the detection of ocean acidification and carbon dioxide uptake and storage, with the research extending from the tropics to the Antarctic shelf. He co-chairs the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON), which involves researchers from 100 countries in monitoring ocean acidification and the impacts on marine life. Major efforts within GOA-ON include data exchange, capacity building, mentoring early career and developing country researchers, and building collaborative regional networks. Since 2016 he has been a co-focal point for the Community of Ocean Action for Sustainable Development Goal 14.3 on ocean acidity, a role organised through the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations.

Tilbrook is also involved in a number of international programs and working groups on sustained observing to determine trends and changing environmental conditions in the oceans. He is a frequent participant in major conferences and in 2021 is co-chair of the 5th International Symposium on the Oceans in a High CO2 World, Lima, Peru. He has 10730 citations for 90 publications (ISI Web of Science core collection).

Scientific Committee Memberships

Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network, co-chair
Community of Ocean Acidification, focal point
IAPSO working group on pH best practices, member
Mutistressor working group for the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, member
Surface Ocean Carbon Atlas, co-lead for Southern Ocean
Global Ocean Data Analysis Project Reference Group, member

Selected Publications

Friedlingstein, P., Jones, M. W., et al., incl. Tilbrook, B.(2019) Global Carbon Budget 2019, Earth System Science Data, 11(4), 1783–1838, doi: 10.5194/essd-11-1783-2019
Tilbrook, B., et al. (2019) An Enhanced Ocean Acidification Observing Network: From People to Technology to Data Synthesis and Information Exchange. Frontiers in Marine Science, 6, 337, doi: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00337
Pardo, P. C., B. Tilbrook, C. Langlais, T. W. Trull and S. R. Rintoul (2017) Carbon uptake and biogeochemical change in the Southern Ocean, South of Australia. Biogeosciences, 14, 5217-5237, doi: 10.5194/bg-14-5217-2017
Landschutzer, P., N. Gruber, F. A. Haumann, C. Rodenbeck, D.C.E. Bakker, S. van Heuven, M. Hoppema, N. Metzl, C. Sweeney, T. Takahashi, B. Tilbrook and R. Wanninkhof (2015) The Reinvigoration of the Southern Ocean Carbon Sink, Science, 349(6253), 1221-1224, doi: 10.1126/science.aab2620
Sabine, C. L., R.A. Feely, N. Gruber, R. M. Key, K. Lee, J. L. Bullister, R. Wanninkhof, C.S. Wong, D.W.R. Wallace, B.Tilbrook, F. J. Millero, T-H. Peng, A. Kozyr, T. Ono, and A. F. Rios (2004) The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2, Science, 305, 367-3717

Associated links

Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network

Surface Ocean Carbon Atlas

Global Data Analysis Project

UN Sustainable Development Goal, SDG14

Integrated Marine Observing System

DSC_6539

TOM TRULL
Research Associate

E: tom.trull@csiro.au

   CSIRO Profile

About Tom & AAPP Involvement:

Tom's research targets quantification of the biological carbon pump and its probable changes in response to climate warming and ocean acidification.

Via his co-leadership of the IMOS BGC-Argo sub-facility, Tom contributes to the deployment and data delivery from BGC-Argo floats in the Southern Ocean.

From 1 July 2020, Tom has ceased direct participation in AAPP, but remains available for consultation via his associate status.

About Tom & AAPP Involvement:

Tom's research targets quantification of the biological carbon pump and its probable changes in response to climate warming and ocean acidification.

Via his co-leadership of the IMOS BGC-Argo sub-facility, Tom contributes to the deployment and data delivery from BGC-Argo floats in the Southern Ocean.

From 1 July 2020, Tom has ceased direct participation in AAPP, but remains available for consultation via his associate status.

DSC_6578

TAS VAN OMMEN
Glaciologist

E: tas.van.ommen@awe.gov.au

   AAD Profile

About Tas & AAPP Involvement:

Tas is a glaciologist from the Australian Antarctic Division working within the AAPP Theme 1, contributing to ice core and ice shelf projects.  Tas leads the Antarctic Climate Program at the AAD.

About Tas & AAPP Involvement:

Tas is a glaciologist from the Australian Antarctic Division working within the AAPP Theme 1, contributing to ice core and ice shelf projects.  Tas leads the Antarctic Climate Program at the AAD.

dirk_welsford

DIRK WELSFORD
AAPP Management Committee

E: dirk.welsford@awe.gov.au

   AAD Profile

Social Links

About Dirk & AAPP Involvement:

Dirk moved to Hobart in 1998 to take up a University of Tasmania PhD scholarship, studying the biology and population dynamics of shallow reef wrasse species. In 2003, as a research scientist at the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, he worked on a range of projects, including assessment of the Small Pelagics Fishery, impacts of recreational fishing, and using video to assess interactions between midwater trawls and marine mammals.

Dirk joined the Australian Antarctic Division as the leader of the Fish and Fisheries group in 2006, and became Leader of the Antarctic Conservation and Management Program in 2016. He is currently involved in a range of projects related to the assessment of fish stocks at Heard Island and McDonald Islands, krill and fish stocks of East Antarctica, and assessing and mitigating human impacts and conservation of biodiversity in Australia’s Antarctic and subantarctic territories.

My interests include:

use of science and logic in developing resource use and conservation strategies;
effective communication of science for use by policy makers; and
the role of human relationships in effective decision making.

About Dirk & AAPP Involvement:

Dirk moved to Hobart in 1998 to take up a University of Tasmania PhD scholarship, studying the biology and population dynamics of shallow reef wrasse species. In 2003, as a research scientist at the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, he worked on a range of projects, including assessment of the Small Pelagics Fishery, impacts of recreational fishing, and using video to assess interactions between midwater trawls and marine mammals.

Dirk joined the Australian Antarctic Division as the leader of the Fish and Fisheries group in 2006, and became Leader of the Antarctic Conservation and Management Program in 2016. He is currently involved in a range of projects related to the assessment of fish stocks at Heard Island and McDonald Islands, krill and fish stocks of East Antarctica, and assessing and mitigating human impacts and conservation of biodiversity in Australia’s Antarctic and subantarctic territories.

My interests include:

use of science and logic in developing resource use and conservation strategies;
effective communication of science for use by policy makers; and
the role of human relationships in effective decision making.

Sea ice from above 2 - Credit Jan Lieser.jpg

KAREN WESTWOOD
Research Scientist

E: karen.westwood@aad.gov.au

Social Links

About Karen & AAPP Involvement:

Karen works at the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) within the Southern Ocean Ecosystems and Monitoring group - part of the Marine Conservation and Management program. 

Karen's main involvement within the AAPP is through the TEMPO voyage (Trends in Euphausiids off Mawson, Predators, and Oceanography), to be undertaken on RV Investigator in January 2021. She is the project manager for this voyage, and also the biological oceanography team leader. The aims of the voyage include revision of the krill biomass estimate for CCAMLR Division 58.4.2 East, and the exploration of food web linkages from microbes to krill to higher order predators. In particular, she will examine phytoplankton distribution and abundance, and characterise the phytoplankton communities that krill specifically target. Karen's team will also be deploying BGC-Argo floats and undertaking CO2 measurements throughout the voyage. The voyage contributes primarily to Theme 3 “The future of sea-ice krill and ecosystems”, Project 7 “Krill and Ecosystems”. It also contributes to Theme 2 “Nature and impacts of Southern Ocean change”, Project 5 “Biogeochemistry”.

About Karen & AAPP Involvement:

Karen works at the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) within the Southern Ocean Ecosystems and Monitoring group - part of the Marine Conservation and Management program. 

Karen's main involvement within the AAPP is through the TEMPO voyage (Trends in Euphausiids off Mawson, Predators, and Oceanography), to be undertaken on RV Investigator in January 2021. She is the project manager for this voyage, and also the biological oceanography team leader. The aims of the voyage include revision of the krill biomass estimate for CCAMLR Division 58.4.2 East, and the exploration of food web linkages from microbes to krill to higher order predators. In particular, she will examine phytoplankton distribution and abundance, and characterise the phytoplankton communities that krill specifically target. Karen's team will also be deploying BGC-Argo floats and undertaking CO2 measurements throughout the voyage. The voyage contributes primarily to Theme 3 “The future of sea-ice krill and ecosystems”, Project 7 “Krill and Ecosystems”. It also contributes to Theme 2 “Nature and impacts of Southern Ocean change”, Project 5 “Biogeochemistry”.

Sea ice from above 2 - Credit Jan Lieser.jpg

MATT WOODHOUSE
Research Scientist

E: matthew.woodhouse@csiro.au

   CSIRO Profile

About Matt & AAPP Involvement:

Matt is contributing to Project 1 (Atmosphere), which aims to reduce the Southern Ocean radiation bias in atmospheric models. He principally uses the ACCESS model and the GLOMAP aerosol scheme, but also has interests in earth system connections and their representation in models.

About Matt & AAPP Involvement:

Matt is contributing to Project 1 (Atmosphere), which aims to reduce the Southern Ocean radiation bias in atmospheric models. He principally uses the ACCESS model and the GLOMAP aerosol scheme, but also has interests in earth system connections and their representation in models.

Sea ice from above 2 - Credit Jan Lieser.jpg

PHILIPPE ZIEGLER
Research Scientist

E: philippe.ziegler@awe.gov.au

About Philippe & AAPP Involvement:

Philippe is a Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Antarctic Division and responsible for the science to support the management of Australia's Southern Ocean fisheries, including the toothfish and icefish fisheries at Heard Island and McDonald Islands and exploratory toothfish fisheries in the area of the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). Philippe's involvement in AAPP is through Project 7 (Krill and Ecosystems) as a population dynamics scientist.

About Philippe & AAPP Involvement:

Philippe is a Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Antarctic Division and responsible for the science to support the management of Australia's Southern Ocean fisheries, including the toothfish and icefish fisheries at Heard Island and McDonald Islands and exploratory toothfish fisheries in the area of the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). Philippe's involvement in AAPP is through Project 7 (Krill and Ecosystems) as a population dynamics scientist.