Welcome aboard TEMPO

The TEMPO research voyage sailed from Hobart on 29 January 2021.

This voyage to Antarctica will investigate the distribution, density and connectivity of populations of Antarctic krill, and better understand the distribution and contribution of deep-sea krill to overall krill biomass.

TEMPO stands for Trends in Euphausiids off Mawson, Predators, and Oceanography.

The images & stories below are by the scientists & crew on board.

The science team on this board TEMPO includes 20 participants from three institutions, including Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), Australian Antarctic Program Partnership (AAPP), and University of Sydney. Science funds were contributed by AAD, Pew, AAPP and the Antarctic Science Foundation, with a grant of sea time provided by the CSIRO Marine National Facility.

VOYAGE BLOG

Krill research voyage ends in success

By Australian Antarctic Program | March 24, 2021

Media Release: The Australian Antarctic Program Partnership (AAPP) has welcomed the successful completion of a major krill research voyage into the Southern Ocean.

Why we study the ocean depths

By Annie Foppert | March 16, 2021

Why do oceanographers send scientific instruments thousands of metres below the ocean surface?

Dreams come true!

By So Kawaguchi and Rob King | March 10, 2021

Our researchers on board TEMPO sprang into action, when an unusually long and thick krill swarm appeared on the echogram.

Meet the Predator Observers

By Maria Isabel Garcia-Rojas | March 9, 2021

The Predator Observer team has recorded 445 sightings of marine mammals.

A quick KOMBI update

By So Kawaguchi and Rob King | March 8, 2021

The TEMPO team has successfully deployed all three KOMBIs.

ABC Radio interviews Dr Rob King

By Australian Antarctic Program | March 4, 2021

‘The entire vessel is on a port list, because we’re being hit by a 40 knot wind that’s screaming down off Antarctica… it’s pretty spectacular!’

Eye-to-eye with a krill swarm

By So Kawaguchi, Rob King & Gavin Macaulay | March 3, 2021

For decades scientists have wondered how the Antarctic krill population is distributed under the shield of Antarctic winter sea ice and the development of the KOMBI provides an opportunity to gain valuable clues at a time when humans cannot readily access this area.

KOMBIs away!

By So Kawaguchi and Rob King | February 24, 2021

For decades scientists have wondered how the Antarctic krill population is distributed under the shield of Antarctic winter sea ice and the development of the KOMBI provides an opportunity to gain valuable clues at a time when humans cannot readily access this area.

TEMPO in transit

By Australian Antarctic Program | February 18, 2021

All the years of preparation to make this voyage a reality are now bearing fruit – or in this case krill.

Getting the measure of krill

By Australian Antarctic Program | January 28, 2021

Media Release: Australian Antarctic Program scientists will use a range of novel technologies to measure krill, during a ground-breaking voyage to the Southern Ocean that departs tomorrow.

PHOTO GALLERY